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June 23, 2018

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Looking for PR & Finance Directors -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Elections 2016-2017 -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Why the ERA Failed: Comfort Over Content in the Fight for Women’s Rights -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Extent to Which Parents Should Regulate Their Children’s Abortions -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Human Rights in a Reclusive Context: North Korea -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Separation without Justification: Parental Rights of Pregnant Juveniles in Correctional Facilities -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

U.S. Asylum after September 11: Failures of the PATRIOT and ID Acts -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023 -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

“Social Worker with a Gun:” The Role of Policing in Harm Reduction Among Addicts -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Pulling Principles Out of Thick Air: The Incorporation of Customary International Law Under the Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789 After Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Schuette v. BAMN: Moving Toward a Colorblind Constitution -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

American Women in Combat: What Israel and Canada Can Teach the United States About Integration -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Now Accepting Submissions! -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Join WULR! -

Monday, April 25, 2016

The Intersection of Lawlessness and Justice: Police Misconduct -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

A Recommendation for Eliminating Lifetime Tenure for Federal Judges -

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Admissions Panel A Great Success! -

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Law School Admissions Panel -

Monday, November 3, 2014

VICTORY OF THE MINORITY: The Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Fight for Constitutional Rights -

Monday, June 30, 2014

VACATING CONVICTIONS: The Efficacy of One Form of Relief from the Consequences of Conviction -

Monday, June 30, 2014

LOSING THE BLAME GAME TO WIN FOR THE FAMILY: The Continued Benefits of the No-Fault Divorce Movement, 1969 to Today

Fall 2013 : Volume VII : Issue 1

*Author: Elizabeth Kramer, Carnegie Mellon University

This paper analyzes the legal roots and historical background that established the Fault divorce movement in the context of United States, and how this background juxtaposed to the climate of the late 1960’s that brought the no-fault divorce revolution. The no-fault revolution drastically changed the laws regarding divorce process in an attempt to create structure that would lessen emotional distress for families. Though the goals of a more “objective” court system may have fallen short of ideals due to continued reliance on judge’s subjective opinion, this paper explains that the no-fault model definition of “need” and “equality” for which judges base their subjective assessment of each individual family determine, judge’s methods of allowing evidence and testimonies, determining asset allocation, and deciding child custody. The no-fault judge’s oversight over these realms has created reformed divorce processes for divorced families. These claims are made under the framework of Pennsylvania’s No- Fault laws and are supported with various nationwide research studies and first-hand expert accounts.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

POWER V. PRUDENCE: The Discretionary Powers of the American Prosecutor in Relation to Racial Disparity

Fall 2013 : Volume VII : Issue 1

*Author: Jeffeline Ermilus, Emory University

This project will focus on the prosecutor’s discretion and how it relates to the current status of the criminal justice system. If our justice system is designed to guarantee every person equal protection under the laws, then how is it that certain populations are negatively affected more than others? The focus of this study lands on the prosecutor because they are the most powerful individuals in the justice system. They alone hold the ability to initiate prosecution. Therefore, every person who is under control of the criminal justice system has had some sort of contact with an American prosecutor. The research will attempt to separate the prosecutor from other discretionary actors in the system, such as police officers and judges, to determine whether their decisions have a significant effect on minority populations. We will also examine whether these decisions are intentional or not. From the results of this analysis I will attempt to explain the inequality present in the justice system. This explanation will guide conversation on whether the prosecutor’s role merits oversight or reform.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

THE OPEN BEACHES ACT: From Watershed to Wipeout

Fall 2013 : Volume VII : Issue 1

*Author: Paola Eisner, Brown University

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, whose widespread destruction to coastal property left the National Federal Insurance Program $28 billion dollars in debt, coastal policy experts are reconsidering existing management paradigms. Current regulations increase federal liability in order to spur coastal development, even in vulnerable areas where rebuilding brings yet another bill to the American taxpayer and benefits last only until the next storm. Policymakers are considering changes that include rolling easements and shift liability from the taxpayer to the developer or property owner. Many of these measures, described as a new direction for coastal policy, have been in place in Texas since 1959 with mixed results. “The Open Beaches Act: From Watershed to Wipeout” tells the story of a coastal management paradigm in Texas that predates even the earliest federal coastal management regulations. The history of the drafting of this forward-thinking bill, challenges to this policy, and its current standing allow us to study critically how to draft new coastal policy that promotes ecologically sound management while maximizing success and preempting costly litigation.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

THE LEGAL REINTERPRETATION OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND THE REDEFINITION OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE BLACK IN THE IVY LEAGUE: A Study of Black Student Perceptions of Affirmative Action

Fall 2013 : Volume VII : Issue 1

*Author: Chaya Crowder, Columbia University

“Diversity” is a prevalent buzzword amongst elite universities throughout the United States. Although Columbia University’s student population is 12.1 percent Black, this figure includes not only traditional African-American students but also West Indian and African students. This paper will retrace the historical intention and purpose of affirmative action to reveal its original intent, while exploring the Supreme Court cases that have established affirmative action as the diversity-based institution that it is today. Furthermore, this paper will analyze the discussion between focus groups of exclusively traditional African-American students born in the United States as well as direct immigrant and first-generation Caribbean and African Black students to elucidate their perspectives on affirmative action and the changing demographics of Black student populations at elite universities.

These focus groups demonstrated that double consciousness is a pervasive element in informing traditional African-American students’ perspective and established negative perceptions of affirmative action. Conversely, the lack of historical double consciousness allowed Black immigrant students to view affirmative action as an opportunity that is not completely necessary for their success at the university.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

PROMETHEUS AND THE FUTURE OF SOFTWARE PATENTABILITY

WULR Volume VI, Issue III, Spring 2013
Prometheus and the Future of Software Patentability

Gareth Tan
University of Chicago

ABSTRACT
The Supreme Court’s decision in Mayo v. Prometheus (2012) dealt
with biotechnology patentability but carries significant implications
for computer technology law. An analysis of an earlier trilogy of
algorithm patentability cases that the Court finds to be controlling –
Benson, Flook, and Diehr – shows that the Court’s ruling in
Prometheus is hardly faithful to precedent. Instead, Prometheus is
better understood as a case that attempts to improve on the deficiencies
of patent law in the absence of Congressional legislation. In particular,
it places renewed emphasis on the prohibition against patenting natural
laws, and in doing so opens a path to curtailing the issue of patents on
algorithms in a future case, a move which is sure to bolster innovation
in the technology industry.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.