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June 24, 2018

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Looking for PR & Finance Directors -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Elections 2016-2017 -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Why the ERA Failed: Comfort Over Content in the Fight for Women’s Rights -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Extent to Which Parents Should Regulate Their Children’s Abortions -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Human Rights in a Reclusive Context: North Korea -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Separation without Justification: Parental Rights of Pregnant Juveniles in Correctional Facilities -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

U.S. Asylum after September 11: Failures of the PATRIOT and ID Acts -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023 -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

“Social Worker with a Gun:” The Role of Policing in Harm Reduction Among Addicts -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Pulling Principles Out of Thick Air: The Incorporation of Customary International Law Under the Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789 After Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Schuette v. BAMN: Moving Toward a Colorblind Constitution -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

American Women in Combat: What Israel and Canada Can Teach the United States About Integration -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Now Accepting Submissions! -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Join WULR! -

Monday, April 25, 2016

The Intersection of Lawlessness and Justice: Police Misconduct -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

A Recommendation for Eliminating Lifetime Tenure for Federal Judges -

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Admissions Panel A Great Success! -

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Law School Admissions Panel -

Monday, November 3, 2014

VICTORY OF THE MINORITY: The Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Fight for Constitutional Rights -

Monday, June 30, 2014

VACATING CONVICTIONS: The Efficacy of One Form of Relief from the Consequences of Conviction -

Monday, June 30, 2014

VICTORY OF THE MINORITY: The Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Fight for Constitutional Rights

Spring 2014 : Volume VII : Issue 3

Author: Jong In Yoon, Columbia University

The Jehovah’s Witnesses, despite their unpopularity with the public, were able to defend their beliefs and the right to act on them due to their willingness to go against mainstream ideals and opinions. While the most famous Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Supreme Court case might be the Minersville School District vs. Gobitis case regarding flag saluting in public schools, this paper instead takes a closer look at a different set of cases regarding religious solicitation, the most important one being Murdock v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In Murdock, the Jehovah’s Witnesses garnered the right to pass out their own literature freely without a license, and in the process, paved the way for other religious groups to do so as well. In analysis of Murdock and other legal cases, one can see that despite their marginal standing, the Jehovah’s Witnesses have helped to redefine ideas about religious freedom while protecting their liberties as a religious group. Ultimately, the case of the Jehovah’s Witnesses illustrates that religious freedom is granted to all groups, and the First Amendment keeps the promise of religious diversity alive.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

VACATING CONVICTIONS: The Efficacy of One Form of Relief from the Consequences of Conviction

Spring 2014 : Volume VII : Issue 3

*Author: Emily Tenenbom, University of Washington

This piece is an in-depth exploration of the implications of Washington State’s vacate statute, which allows ex-offenders to retroactively state that they were not convicted of that crime should they meet particular conditions. Despite exhaustive sociological work and legal scholarship investigating the various “collateral consequences” of criminal convictions, few in academia have pursued an in-depth analysis of the efficacy of existing legal modes of relief. This study is significant in that it closely examines a specific and widely-utilized legal remedy; it seeks to answer whether, and in what ways, vacating a conviction in Washington State operates as an effective post-conviction mode of relief from the stigma associated with a criminal conviction.The results of this study indicate that the mitigating impact of vacating on the stigma of conviction is often temporary and is inconsistent at best, its potential inhibited in large part by the increasing presence of material criminal records.However, according to qualitative data from ten respondents, vacating is worthwhile in that it can increase self-confidence and communicate positive self-understandings to individuals who have been perpetually misrepresented and stigmatized.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

INTEGRATION AND INTERESTS: The Forgotten Role of Judge Walter Hoffman in Ending Massive Resistance in Virginia

Spring 2014 : Volume VII : Issue 3

*Author: Michael Payne, College of William & Mary

In the aftermath of Brown v. Board, the Supreme Court left it to school authorities to solve the logistical problems of integrating schools. Virginia subverted the aims of the Supreme Court and instead used local school authorities to delay integration, ultimately resulting in the closure of Norfolk’s public schools. As such, the burden of desegregating schools fell onto lower federal courts and local citizens’ groups. Norfolk serves as an instructive case study. District Judge Walter E. Hoffman and local business, student, and church groups were powerful advocates for desegregation. Together, they pressured Norfolk’s school board into reopening schools. This broke the will of segregationists, ultimately resulting in the end of massive resistance and the integration of Virginia schools.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

LEGAL HYPOCRISY AND EXTRAVAGANT POLITICAL THEATRE: Sovereign Immunity and its Effects on Contemporary American Politics

Spring 2014 : Volume VII : Issue 3

*Author: Habib Olapade, Stanford University

When the founders revised their states’ legal codes, in the midst of the revolution, several of them were content to retain the English common law tradition as the foundation of their new republic’s historically novel “empire of laws.” As conservative revolutionaries, who for the most part did not want to upset the prevailing socio-economic order of their provinces this cross-application was not unexpected. However, if one believes that a society’s legal code should be a reflection of its beliefs or social mores, then this move is problematic. The British and American governmental systems were based on fundamentally dissimilar notions of the relationship between the governors and governed and how this relationship should display itself in judicial proceedings.

While British law dictated that the king or “sovereign” was not bound to answer to law suits because he was the living embodiment of the national will, the Americans had just finished fighting a seven year war refuting those notions so that the people proper could be sovereign. Yet, as the ratification debates of 1787-1788 demonstrated, the founders’ notions of the relationship between the state and citizen were far from uniform. One can track the progress of this disagreement throughout our nation’s history by looking at how courts and politicians viewed this relationship and this aspect is most salient when one turns their attention to the legal and political evolution of the eleventh amendment’s sovereign immunity clause. The draft attached below is an informative, terse, but by no means exhaustive discussion of sovereign immunity’s history in American law and its contemporary impact on a wide variety of pertinent issues, from government mandated universal healthcare to the regulation of Native American economic activities. It is my sincere hope that this unique rendition of our judicial system will not only change the way the reader looks at the federal court system but force us to ask more pressing questions that challenge our judicial system’s stereotypes.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.

THROWING STONES AT GLASS HOUSES: A Consideration of Methamphetamine Addiction, Psychosis, and Treatment in Criminal Contexts

 Spring 2014 : Volume VII : Issue 3

*Author: Amanda Bakowski, University of Pennsylvania

Advances in neurological and psychological research as well as in brain imaging techniques allow for groundbreaking analysis into the brain and its connection to behavior. For example, researchers are able to identify complex structural changes brought about by psychological disorders, including substance abuse and addiction. However, this greater insight into a person’s neurobiological conditions at the time a crime is committed has created debate in the legal community. Deciding how to properly incorporate such information into legal proceedings, determining responsibility and competency when substances are involved, identifying how psychosis and psychotic symptoms of substance use affect criminal behavior, and treating addicted offenders are all necessary facets of this debate. One of the most addictive substances, methamphetamine, has seen a surge in use in both the general and criminal populations. This paper argues that as the epidemic of addiction and rate of methamphetamine use in conjunction with criminal activity has increased, the legal system must continue to address the issue with a more sophisticated understanding of the neurological properties of the substance and of the addicted brain. To make this argument, this paper addresses the properties, psychological classification, legal considerations, and currents debates surrounding methamphetamine use in criminal contexts.

To continue reading this article please refer to our “Ordering” tab and purchase your hard copy of this publication, or download an online copy from our “Issues” tab. Thank you.