December 15, 2017

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Looking for PR & Finance Directors -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Elections 2016-2017 -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Why the ERA Failed: Comfort Over Content in the Fight for Women’s Rights -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Extent to Which Parents Should Regulate Their Children’s Abortions -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Human Rights in a Reclusive Context: North Korea -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Separation without Justification: Parental Rights of Pregnant Juveniles in Correctional Facilities -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

U.S. Asylum after September 11: Failures of the PATRIOT and ID Acts -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023 -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

“Social Worker with a Gun:” The Role of Policing in Harm Reduction Among Addicts -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Pulling Principles Out of Thick Air: The Incorporation of Customary International Law Under the Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789 After Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Schuette v. BAMN: Moving Toward a Colorblind Constitution -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

American Women in Combat: What Israel and Canada Can Teach the United States About Integration -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Now Accepting Submissions! -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Join WULR! -

Monday, April 25, 2016

The Intersection of Lawlessness and Justice: Police Misconduct -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

A Recommendation for Eliminating Lifetime Tenure for Federal Judges -

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Admissions Panel A Great Success! -

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Law School Admissions Panel -

Monday, November 3, 2014

VICTORY OF THE MINORITY: The Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Fight for Constitutional Rights -

Monday, June 30, 2014

VACATING CONVICTIONS: The Efficacy of One Form of Relief from the Consequences of Conviction -

Monday, June 30, 2014

Announcements

Article submissions are now open for the Journal! Deadline: December 19!

Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023

Author: Jono Bentley, Stanford University. Published in Volume VIII Issue II. 

The cost associated with a single sequencing of the entire human genome is falling rapidly and is predicted to be no more than $1000 within the coming years. Already, sequencing the human genome can inform health care decisions. Scientific knowledge of human genes will reach a point where a doctor’s use of a genome sequence could slow or prevent genetic disease. With the health care system in the United States facing major economic troubles, due in part to poor preventative care, whole genome sequencing (WGS) could serve as a catalyst for addressing these issues. While it is unrealistic to dictate the health care decisions of competent adults, federal legislation should be passed mandating whole genome sequencing for all new births in the United States. This paper looks first at the technology of whole genome sequencing, followed by a discussion of the economics of a mandate, a look at non-economic benefits and problems with a mandate, a discussion of the need for a compulsory mandate as opposed to optional screening, and finally suggests steps for implementing a whole genome sequencing mandate for new births. The paper will present the case that mandating WGS has the potential to bring about one of the most significant reforms in the history of medicine.

 

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