January 16, 2018

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Looking for PR & Finance Directors -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Elections 2016-2017 -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Why the ERA Failed: Comfort Over Content in the Fight for Women’s Rights -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Extent to Which Parents Should Regulate Their Children’s Abortions -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Human Rights in a Reclusive Context: North Korea -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Separation without Justification: Parental Rights of Pregnant Juveniles in Correctional Facilities -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

U.S. Asylum after September 11: Failures of the PATRIOT and ID Acts -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023 -

Thursday, May 5, 2016

“Social Worker with a Gun:” The Role of Policing in Harm Reduction Among Addicts -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Pulling Principles Out of Thick Air: The Incorporation of Customary International Law Under the Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789 After Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Schuette v. BAMN: Moving Toward a Colorblind Constitution -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

American Women in Combat: What Israel and Canada Can Teach the United States About Integration -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Now Accepting Submissions! -

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Join WULR! -

Monday, April 25, 2016

The Intersection of Lawlessness and Justice: Police Misconduct -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

A Recommendation for Eliminating Lifetime Tenure for Federal Judges -

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Admissions Panel A Great Success! -

Sunday, November 9, 2014

Law School Admissions Panel -

Monday, November 3, 2014

VICTORY OF THE MINORITY: The Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Fight for Constitutional Rights -

Monday, June 30, 2014

VACATING CONVICTIONS: The Efficacy of One Form of Relief from the Consequences of Conviction -

Monday, June 30, 2014

Why the ERA Failed: Comfort Over Content in the Fight for Women’s Rights

Author: Cameron Smith, Stanford University. Published in Volume VIII Issue II.   In the late 1970s, after an arduous journey of more than half a century, the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was on the verge of becoming an amendment to the United States Constitution. The ERA had been approved in both houses of Congress—by far more than the requisite two-thirds vote—and it needed ratification from only three more states in order to satisfy the constitutional requirement. Yet, the ERA never managed to fulfill the ratification requirement. Given its overwhelming support in Congress, the ERA’s failure was largely unexpected, and remains…

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The Extent to Which Parents Should Regulate Their Children’s Abortions

  Author: Peter Li, Stanford University. Published in Volume VIII Issue II. This paper examines the extent to which parents should regulate their children’s abortions in the United States. It is a tailored examination of a particular aspect of abortion that sets aside the debate over abortion as a procedure to focus on issues surrounding the fact that children in the United States can acquire abortions. Given the serious implications of the procedure, there is a need to ensure children’s’ competence prior to their obtaining an abortion. Age restrictions with exceptions for abortions are logical protective measures. Currently, judicial bypasses…

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Human Rights in a Reclusive Context: North Korea

  Author: Daniel Keum, University of Washington. Volume VIII Issue II. The strategies transnational federations have undertaken in confronting the North Korean human rights crisis are inadequate and have exacerbated cases of state violence against the North Korean people. This paper will explore human rights violations in the context of international and domestic law to further understand Pyongyang’s political calculus. From this understanding, changes are suggested to the original approach international regimes have adopted to tackle the North Korean crisis. Ultimately, this paper will suggest international regimes to situate Pyongyang in a context of political instability and anxiety to understand…

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Separation without Justification: Parental Rights of Pregnant Juveniles in Correctional Facilities

  Author: Victoria Kalumbi, Stanford University. Published in Volume VIII Issue II. Adolescent females are a rapidly increasing population within the juvenile justice system, a number of whom are pregnant or mothers while held in detention facilities. Under the current system, pregnant adolescents have few, if any, rights to parenthood and face significant barriers in receiving adequate physical and mental health treatment. This paper argues that adolescent mothers have specific rights that cannot be infringed upon or limited by the state while incarcerated; chief of these rights is the right to be a parent. The denial of this right is…

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U.S. Asylum after September 11: Failures of the PATRIOT and ID Acts

Author: Miriam El Nemr, University of Washington. Published in Volume III Issue II.  After September 11, the United States focus turned to securing the country and preventing future threats. Although two major pieces of legislation, the 2001 PATRIOT Act and the 2005 Real ID Act aimed to enhance security, both ultimately weakened the asylum system instead by increasing judicial discretion. Especially impacted are women and children as a result of the legislation. This article investigates the post-September 11 acts and their impact on asylum-seekers in the United States, highlighting their negative consequences.

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Genomicare: The Affordable Care Act of 2023

Author: Jono Bentley, Stanford University. Published in Volume VIII Issue II.  The cost associated with a single sequencing of the entire human genome is falling rapidly and is predicted to be no more than $1000 within the coming years. Already, sequencing the human genome can inform health care decisions. Scientific knowledge of human genes will reach a point where a doctor’s use of a genome sequence could slow or prevent genetic disease. With the health care system in the United States facing major economic troubles, due in part to poor preventative care, whole genome sequencing (WGS) could serve as a catalyst…

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“Social Worker with a Gun:” The Role of Policing in Harm Reduction Among Addicts

  sdfgfdhdAuthor: Hannah Schwendeman, University of Washington. To be published in Volume IX Issue I, Winter 2016! The relationship between the police and addicts is obviously fraught with tension; however, while the police are seen as an instrument of oppression and aggression to many addicts, they are also representatives of the institution most likely to improve addicts’ circumstances due to their discretion and authority. If we acknowledge that the police are not law enforcers, but agents of security and peace, then it is possible for the police to enact forms of harm reduction. While the police and drug addicts will…

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Pulling Principles Out of Thick Air: The Incorporation of Customary International Law Under the Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789 After Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain

Author: Habib Olapade, Stanford University. To be published in Volume IX Issue 1, Winter 2016! This essay conducts a critical analysis of Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent in Sosa v. Alvarez-Machain. In Sosa, David Souter, writing for six of the justices, held that federal courts could incorporate customary international law (CIL) into their interpretations of the Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA), § 9(b) of the Judiciary Act of 1789, as long as the custom in question was specific and accepted by the international community. Scalia dissented and maintained that federal courts had surrendered the power to incorporate CIL into their decisions…

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Schuette v. BAMN: Moving Toward a Colorblind Constitution

Author: Stephanie Haines, Grinnell College. To be published in Volume IX Issue I, Winter 2016! This paper analyzes the recent Schuette v. BAMN Supreme Court decision in terms of social, historical, and legal context and also considers larger implications of the decision.  It argues that this decision continues the Roberts Court shift toward a colorblind Constitution.  This paper was submitted as a final research paper for Professor Rebecca Hamlin’s constitutional law seminar at Grinnell College in the spring of 2014.  

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American Women in Combat: What Israel and Canada Can Teach the United States About Integration

Author: Dakota Blagg, University of Washington. To be published in Volume IX Issue I, Winter 2016! The United States will rescind its combat exclusion ban on women in 2016. Opponents fear that integration will undermine unit cohesion, weaken combat effectiveness, increase sexual assault rates, and undermine safety through chivalry. Elsewhere, Canada and Israel do not exclude women from combat. Their experiences suggest what are likely to be the effects of ending the combat ban in the United States. This paper examines whether women should be given the right to serve in combat based on the experiences these other countries have…

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