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The Climbing Club • View topic - A Week in the Tetons

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 Post subject: A Week in the Tetons
PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 4:23 pm 
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Cap'n Wingspan
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Location: Wallingford
With the summer season over, I, along with my fellow instructors Bryan Hendrick and Bill Bjornstad made plans to spend a week in the Tetons, a goal of mine for some time now. After reading about Grace and Obadiah's experience there, I was especially keen to visit the range I had heard so much about but not yet visited.

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Climbing costumes? check

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Climbing is serious business, mkay? I wore this until I lost the helmet cover on the Exum

We set out for the long 10 hour drive on the morning of August 25th, and enjoyed an uneventful trip to Jackson, where we met with one of Bill's friends who was able to provide us with a handy spot to sleep under the stars in a field next to his house.

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Sunset in Wyoming from the road

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One more shot

The following morning we picked up our permits at the Jenny Lake Ranger station, amazed by the towering Tetons directly above us. For such large and imposing peaks, they rise up majestically with little preamble from the flat valley floor. Although we arrived on a Friday, we were luckily able to secure a permit for 6 nights; the downside is that we could only camp in each camping zone for two nights, so we would have to move our camp 4 times in 6 days. Oh well, at least the permit was free.

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First really good view of the range

Around noon we parked and were met at the trailhead by our fourth, our friend Adam Fisher who had driven up from Salt Lake City that morning. We divvied the food and gear and set off down the mellow (paved!) trail. Eventually the pavement ran out and the trail started ascending gradually into the Garnet Canyon, situated due east of the Middle Teton and between the South and Grand Tetons.

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Shadow of the Tetons in the valley below. Photo by Adam Fisher

Several hours of leisurely walking brought us to the Platforms, the lowest of the camping areas and our destination for the night. We had the place to ourselves and made a nice camp, all four of us cozy in the Megamid.

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Bill on the approach hike, shortly before the platforms

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Panorama of our camp at the platforms. Photo by Bryan Hendrick

Our plan was to climb the Southeast ridge of the Middle Teton for our first climb, as we wanted to avoid anything on or near the Grand over the weekend. A 6AM start saw us heading up the South Fork of the canyon to reach the base of the ridge.

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Bill below the Zorro Snowfield on the approach to the SE Ridge

An unfortunate estimate of the time required to reach the base of the climbing resulted in a 3.5 hour approach: we were wearing approach shoes and didn't bring our axes, and thus were unable to climb the ~700 feet of steep, hard snow in the couloir leading to the first pitch. We were forced to scramble up dirty, wet, and very loose 3rd to 5th class terrain before reaching the climb, under beautiful sunny skies.

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Adam climbing up a nasty wet chimney to reach the climb

Climbing as two teams of two we began up the first of the 5 moderate pitches. The climb, 10 pitches up to 5.8 can really be split into two sections: the first is 5 pitches of 5.7/5.8 of amazing flakes and cracks, followed by roughly 5 pitches of very low 5th. Climbing with Bryan I took the first lead up superbly solid flakes, amazingly fun climbing. The next several pitches were mostly more of the same, high in quality and pleasure.

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Bryan just after the crux of P2

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Afro Bill belaying Adam at the start of the simulblock

As we finished the 5th pitch, where we planned to start simulclimbing our weather concerns were realized. Large dark clouds began building to the southeast, heading our way. Ominous occasional peals of thunder made us stop and consider our options. We could descend down a loose, unknown gully and potentially have to leave gear behind, or try to race the storm to the summit, where we knew we could get up and over to the walk off down the southwest couloir. As a group we opted to race.

Bryan set off the first sumulblock and we moved quickly, placing minimal gear. Before the final headwall below the south summit we switched and I raced up a broken dihedral. Reaching the south summit we could see a large dark cloud rippling with lightning about to crash into the summit like a foot onto an anthill. We were the ants.

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No Me Gusta

Adam and Bill set up the necessary rappel into the notch between the north and south summits and Bill fixed a line to the summit, which helped us all get up quickly and safely. On the summit we hustled to gather our ropes and gear as the storm began pelting us with graupel, a sign of imminent lightning. To our continual amazement as we topped our a young kid in running shoes and a t-shirt appeared on the summit, and asked us if we knew which one of these was the summit of the Middle Teton. His older partner shortly followed, making small talk about where we were camped, and most amazingly, how cool looking the clouds were from up here. They appeared completely oblivious to the storm about to descend upon them and were more interested in chatting. Bill, to his credit, advised them of the imminent danger and told them they needed to go, right the fuck now. They smartly took his advice and departed, followed shortly by us.

Fortunately the descent was easy and, although a bit loose, quite fast. As we ran down the gully the storm loosed it's rain and more graupel on us, but refrained from unleashing its full wrath. By 4 we were soon down to the saddle between the Middle and South Tetons where we were able to finally stop and take some time for food and water, the first since breakfast, as the storm dissipated. An annoying walk down lots of talus brought us back to the central garnet canyon and our camp, about 12 hours after departing. We had thought of this as something of a warm-up and familiarization climb, but it turned into a pretty full value and tiring day. As much as we hated to, we had to pack up camp and hike it another 300 feet uphill to the meadows campsite where we spent a restful night.

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Panorama of (L-R) the Middle Teton, the Grand Teton and some of it's subsidiary towers, and Disappointment Peak. Photo by Bryan Hendrick

The following day we decided to climb the easy (5.4, 4 pitches) West Ridge of the Teepee Tower, a smallish tower detached from the southeast flank of the Grand Teton. Since the approach would take us past the caves campsite, our spot for the next two nights, we opted to pack up camp and get the move over with to save a trip. Under hot sunny skies we reached the caves, around 9700 feet and picked out a couple nicely developed caves. While eating lunch and relaxing we met two young women who were former OB instructors from Montana, working for NOLS now that the OB Montana based is closed. We sat and chatted for an hour or so and were glad to learn they planned to camp at the caves the following night. They also told us they were planning to climb the full Exum Ridge the following day, which was our plan as well. This would turn out to be propitious, as I will describe later.

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The spectacular line of Irene's Arete, a ridge on Disappointment Peak, which we contemplated climbing. We were able to watch several teams silhouetted against the skyline with my binoculars

Bill chose to rest, so around midday, Bryan Adam and I set off up the trail to the moraines camp, stopping periodically to try to discern just which thing we saw was the Teepee Tower and to make sense of the approach description. After an hour we were finally starting to get our bearings when another storm rolled in. The ranger that had issued us our permits passed by, hustling to get to the lower saddle and his camp before the storm broke. As we were chatting, the Teepee Tower was struck by lightning and the clouds opened. Down we went in the increasingly violent storm.

Upon reaching our caves we jumped in to escape the deluge. This storm, unlike the one the day prior, was not so restrained, and settled in for a good three hours of intense thunder, lightning, rain and hail. The caves, seemingly so well protected, turned out to be total crap in a storm. Besides the obvious danger of sitting in a small cave during a lightning storm, the rain managed to find it's way in by the bucketfull, flooding us out. We set up the mid outside and retreated to the relative safety and dryness to wait out the storm. Eventually it broke, the sun came out, and we had a pleasant evening drying our things and enjoying the spectacular views of the clifftop campsite.


Last edited by Evan Jewett on Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:43 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 7:10 pm 
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experienced hiker of the climbing club
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 10:50 pm 
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Cap'n Wingspan
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Our foray to the moraines camp area had taken an hour from the caves, so we figured a reasonable estimate would be 2.5 hours up to the lower saddle and the base of the Exum Ridge, our goal for the following day. As we really didn't want to be climbing behind other parties and had no idea how many people might be up there, we opted for a 2AM wake up and a 3AM departure from camp. We figured this would get us to the base of the ridge around sunup, which would allow us to pick out the notably features of the climb. The guidebook advises that one should locate the major features of the ridge from the lower saddle. We had not scouted this out, so were relying on the light to show us the way.

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3 AM, ready to go. Photo by Adam Fisher

In what turned out to be a bit of a trend, we were way off on our approach timing; it took us 1 hour and 15 minutes to get to the lower saddle, about half of the time we had allotted. As it was just after 4AM, all the Exum guides with their clients were just preparing to leave, so we stashed some gear and fell into line behind them. All the Exum clients wear orange half dome helmets, so when I headed off the trail (with my orange half dome helmet) the guides were somewhat confused about what their client was doing. It took them a while to figure out I wasn't with them, and one of them kindly pointed out the not very obvious turnoff for the trail to the lower Exum. All the guides and clients were heading up the Owen Spaulding or the Upper Exum, both accessed from the upper saddle and Wall Street.

We descended in the general direction of the lower Exum ridge and realized we had no fucking clue where we were. It was maybe 4:30, a solid hour before the sun even started thinking about showing up. Bill scouted around while Adam, Bryan and I huddled together to conserve body heat in the stark coldness of early morning. None of us had brought our puffy coats and upon Bill's fruitless return we resigned ourselves to the fact that we would just have to suck it up until the sun rose and removed us from the dark ages.

After 20 minutes of shivering two brightly lit angels descended upon us and showed us the way. Actually it was Anne and Angie, the NOLS instructors we had met the day prior. They had scouted the start of the climb and knew right where to go, and were happy to share their info. We followed them up the 3rd class ramp to the start of the climb where they quickly finished the first pitch. Bryan and I got to climb first, and I started up the easy and fun chimney, eventually taking a slightly harder variation on the left face to build an anchor next to but not on top of Anne.

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Bryan coming up the very cold P1 chimney

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Belaying at the top of pitch 1. Photo by Bill Bjornstad

Bill opted for the 5.8 hand crack variation to the right of the chimney. We were, as a group, 0/8 on number of hands with sensation when finishing the pitch. Damn it's cold that high at 6 AM.

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Early morning lenticulars over the Middle Teton

As Bryan was following the first pitch the sun was doing amazing things with the lenticular clouds streaming over the Middle Teton, and I resolved that the screaming barfies were well worth it.

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Bryan leading P2 of the lower Exum


We swung leads up the easy second pitch, and quickly moved our belay for the 3rd pitch, which was pretty steep and a little bit wandery. Bryan groveled his way up the awkward off-width leaning chimney crack 4th pitch to a belay at the base of the 'black face' pitch.

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Bryan on the P4 awkwardness

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Bryan belaying me on pitch 5, the 'black face' pitch. Photo by Bill Bjornstad

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Adam leading P5 of the Lower Exum

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The sun was up but it was still pretty cold after 5 pitches

Probably my favorite of the week, this was a seemingly very steep (although in reality <90 degrees) pitch with spectacular horizontal ledges and beautiful cracks. It was one of those pitches where you have to remind yourself to place gear because the climbing is so amazing you almost feel you don't need it. I ended up with 6 pieces in a 40 meter pitch, and waited briefly for Anne to depart the obvious belay situated above a precariously detached death block.

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The Middle Teton and the Lower Saddle from somewhere on the Exum. The ranger/guide Weatherports are barely visible on the bottom right. Photo by Bill Bjornstad

Bryan followed the excellent pitch and swung into the 6th, which would take us to the end of the lower Exum. A cool hand crack to a techy face finished it off and we set up for simuling. I lead out and stopped after 30 meters confused by what I found: someone had set up a double rope rappel with two very new looking half ropes on a single sling around a horn, connected with one non-taped non-locking carabiner. There was nobody at the bottom of the rappel and nobody around that I could see, so I had Bryan come up to discuss what to do. I was in favor of pulling the ropes as booty (I wanted to bring them to the ranges and guides to see if they knew what was up with them).

Ultimately we decided to leave them until the descent, since we thought we might be able to get to the base of the rap along Wall Street. My best guess is that someone bailed from the ridge during the massive storm the day before and, as there was intense lightning around the Grand, decided they couldn't take the time to pull their ropes, a rather odd choice. The setup was definitely not a professional or institutional anchor.

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Bryan on the upper exum

We continued a long simul block over and through broken ridges and gullies with occasional 5th class steps. Climbing in our approach shoes now we made rapid progress up the seemingly never ending upper Exum. I have to agree with Obadiah's recent assessment that the Upper Exum is not worth climbing alone, but, as it is what you need to do to reach the summit from the Lower Exum, it is somewhat redeemed.

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Another party we passed on the Upper Exum as the clouds roll in

Upon reaching the summit we found ourselves periodically enshrouded in streaming clouds, with larger, darker thunderheads again forming to the southwest and heading right for us.

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Summit sillyness

We hadn't seen Bill and Adam since we started simuling and decided we didn't want to sit on the summit to wait for them. Our plan was to descend parts of the Owen-Spaulding, which involves a 2 rope rappel. Since we were climbing on 2 ropes and Bill and Adam on one, we resolved to wait a while for them there. As we descended down easy slabs to what we hoped was the upper saddle, the winds became increasingly aggressive. The double rappel, off bolts engraved with "40 meter 2 rope rappel" was really fun - 30 meters of free hanging, blowing in the wind.

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Somewhat obscured summit views

We huddled under a rock and waited over an hour for Bill and Adam, and left them several messages on their phone (one of the advantages/disadvantages of the relative proximity of the range is good cell service). At 3:30 we pulled the ropes, consigning them to the two single raps starting at a station nearby and began the tedious descent in the blustery winds along one of the infinite trail variations from the upper saddle. A quick look over to where we thought the double rope rappel we had found should be revealed the necessity of a number of shenanigans to get to it, so we left it alone and made our way to the lower saddle, often being blown off the trail.
Seeking shelter we met a couple named Caleb and Laura, from Squamish, who it turns out know a number of UWCCers (Val, Jon and Lisa, and the Abegg sisters) who were planning to climb the Exum the following day. We chatted with them for an hour and gave them some beta on the climb while we waited for Bill and Adam who showed up around 5:30. They had simply climbed a bit slower on the simul blocks, pitching a couple sections out. Reunited we returned to camp to complete a winner of a day.

Tired from our efforts and planning a rest day, we slept until late and lounged around camp reading and playing cards. Around 2 we broke camp and descended back down to the meadows, from where we headed back up to the South Fork, our camping zone for our final two nights.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:38 pm 
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And now for something completely different. Actually just a little bit different. Following our rest day we chose for our next route a ridge traverse from Cloudveil Dome to the South Teton, which is part of the Grand Traverse (the last part if you opt for the standard north to south route).

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Arriving at camp in the South Fork

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Sunrise from camp

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Bryan and me on the approach. Photo by Bill Bjornstad

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Middle and Grand Tetons (L-R). The SE ridge descends from the highest point of the Middle Teton

With a couple short sections of very low fifth on the East ridge of Cloudveil and a couple rappels on the route, we brought my two half ropes and decided to climb all together. Beautiful weather greeted us and we approached up the snow slopes (we thought to wear our boots and bring our axes this time) and talus to the saddle between the dome and Nez Perce, the last summit on the Grand Traverse.

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Scrambling up the East Ridge of Cloudveil Dome

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Goofing around with a big bone someone left on the summit of one of the towers. Photo by Adam Fisher

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Yay photobombing. Photo by Adam Fisher

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Bill sporting the newest climbing fashion: the hat butterfly (we found a very lethargic butterfly stuck in the snow). Photo by Bryan Hendrick

Really fun 3rd and 4th class scrambling up the ridge, with a very short section of 5th that we fixed brought us to the summit and the start of the ridge. Up and down similar terrain, we stuck to the ridge proper religiously, often with serious exposure to the south. Occasional snow steps interrupted the mostly solid rock scrambling and we made good progress along the ridge.

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A fun little 5th class step with an awesome crack. Photo by Bryan Hendrick

A couple more short fixed ropes along a highly exposed 5th class steps brought us to the firsth rappel, down to a small saddle and then back up the next tower. Eventually we climbed up and over Ice Cream Cone tower where a double rope rap brought us to the saddle below the east face of the South Teton.

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The steep south face of the Ice Cream Cone tower. Photo by Bryan Hendrick

More fun 3d and 4th and we reached the summit, for a total of 10 summits along the ridge. We lunched for a while on the summit enjoying the spectacular views of the Middle and Grand Tetons. This traverse, although only mildly technical, was packed with fun. Lots of great up and down and good short sections of fun, exposed climbing made for a high quality day.

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Adam and Bill atop one of the small towers on the ridge

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Adam, Bill and Bryan on the South Teton's east face

A quick scramble down the 2nd class northwest gully brought us to the familiar saddle and walk down the talus field to camp.

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Three Amigos

While sitting around enjoying the afternoon, a couple passed through our camp (you pretty much had to go past us to get down to the Meadows), a couple who had been ahead of us descending the talus several hours prior. We watched as they took literally an hour to cover about 200 horizontal yards of 10-20 degree talus and snow. They were for some inexplicable reason roped up and kept belaying each other over short sections of snow with decent run outs (i.e. snow I had kicked steps down in my approach shoes using my nut tool as an axe). Had one of them actually fallen they would almost certainly have pulled the other off their stance, since they were just standing there on unstable snow platforms without an anchor. It was one of the weirder things I've witnessed in the mountains, and it kept us entertained for a couple hours as we tried to guess wtf they were doing. Adam suggested perhaps they thought they were on a glacier. Who knows?

The following day, our last of the trip, we thought about climbing the North Face of Nez Perce, located directly above our camp. A combination of low-motivation by some in the group and a complicated 4th class descent, followed by descending to the car deterred us from attempting it, and we settled on a leisurely hike out. This was a spectacular trip with a great group of partners. The weather, although certainly frenetic, was mostly agreeable. I am really happy to have finally visited the Tetons, and feel now that I have a much better sense of the range and what climbing there entails for future planning.


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 Post subject: Re: A Week in the Tetons
PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:28 am 
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Well done, Evan! looks like a great trip.


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 Post subject: Re: A Week in the Tetons
PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 1:32 pm 
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Looks like an awesome trip!

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